Participate

Are you interested in helping our researchers? Here are the clinical trials seeking participants:

ExerciseRx and Teens with Cerebral Palsy

Researchers at Seattle Children’s and the Sports Institute at UW Medicine want to find ways to use the technology called ExerciseRx to make in-home physical therapy routines easier, especially for teens who have cerebral palsy.

Research is always voluntary!

Would the study be a good fit for me?

This study might be a good fit for you if:

  • Have Cerebral Palsy.
  • Can Walk with or without a mobility device.
  • Are between 13 and 17 years old.
  • Would benefit from a simple home exercise routine.

What would happen if I took part in the study?

If you decide to take part in this study, you would:

  • Be prescribed a standard 5-week home exercise plan.
  • Use the tablet provided to track your exercise routine.
  • Answer brief weekly e-mail surveys.
  • Complete a virtual exit interview and questionnaire.

Adolescents who take part in this study get a physical therapy evaluation (in their home or at the University of Washington) with follow up support at no charge and a $100 gift card to thank them for their time.

There may be possible benefits if you take part in the study: Improved or maintained flexibility and strength, typical of home exercise regimens.

To take part in the study, please fill out this survey: redcap.iths.org/surveys/?s=RN7P33C3L8KDAPTF or contact the study team at exerciserx@uw.edu for more information. 

SIT-PT: Comparison of Two Physical Therapy Approaches for Young Children Beginning to Sit 

The purpose of the SIT-PT study is trying to compare 2 different forms of physical therapy for children who have or at high risk of cerebral palsy. To evaluate these 2 interventions the participants are randomly assigned (like flipping a coin), with half the children participating in each of the interventions. Both interventions are designed to help improve the child’s motor skills, but one focuses on motor skills while the other focuses on both thinking and motor skills. Both programs include 2 physical therapy sessions per week provided in your home or our office, based on the distance. The intervention lasts for 3 months (24 therapy visits), and all study visits are provided to you free of charge. You can continue with all of your current services as well. 

In addition to the intervention, all infants complete 5 play-based assessment sessions over a one-year period. All of the study assessments can be conducted in your home or, if you prefer, in our research lab, by a trained assessor. 

Your child may be eligible to participate if he/she meets these criteria: 

  • Your child is between 8-24 months of age (adjusted for prematurity, if applicable) 
  • Your child has a motor delay or has a medical history that indicates a high risk of cerebral palsy 
  • Your child can NOT get in and out of sitting by him/her self 

For more details or to contact the research team, please visit: start-play.unl.edu/research-program/#current-studies 

Transcutaneous Spinal Stimulation for Children with Cerebral Palsy

The Restorative Technologies Laboratory is currently recruiting children and youth with Cerebral Palsy for a skin-surface stimulation study to improve spasticity and mobility. Participants will receive advanced treadmill training combined with skin-surface electrical stimulation of the spinal cord. Children may be eligible for this study if they are age 4 or older, of GMFCS level I-IV with spastic bilateral cerebral palsy. All study visits occur at UW (parking reimbursed). 

If you have questions or are interested in participating, please contact Siddhi Shrivastav, MS, at siddhis@uw.edu or 973.444.1940. 

Exploring the Needs of Middle Eastern Young Adults with Intellectual Disabilities (ID) during Health Care Transitioning to Adult Care    

Study Purpose:

  • Share the experiences of Middle Eastern young adults with ID and their fam during healthcare transition from pediatric to adult services 
  • Explore the quality of life and healthcare access of Middle Eastern young adults with ID  

Study Activities:

  • Young adults and their caregivers will:
    • Participate in 3 interviews
    • Complete a quality of life measure twice at the enrollment and exit
    • Complete a photo narrative project related to healthcare transition
  • Most of the study activities will occur virtually, however, one in-person visit might be required
  • Some of the study activities will take place at Open Doors for Multicultural Families
  • Interviews may be conducted in Arabic or English based onpreference

Compensation:

  • Each family will receive a $100 gift card for completing all study activities

We are looking for:  

  • Middle Eastern young adults ages 14-24 years with intellectual disability and their caregivers 
  • Living in Washington State  
  • Can complete a 1-hour interview three times  

Contact: Reham Abuatiq at email: rabuat@uw.edu; phone: 619.830.9638    

Novel Prosthetic Foot

A research study seeks to understand how prosthetic foot design impacts walking during everyday activities.

Individuals may be eligible to participate if they: 

  • Have a unilateral above-knee amputation, 

OR

  • bilateral below-knee amputations, 

OR

  • unilateral below-knee amputation and lower level of mobility (K2) and use a prosthetic foot/feet;
  • Can walk more than 400 yards (~4 city blocks) without an increase in pain;
  • Are at least 16 years of age; and
  • Weigh no more than 365 lbs. 

Study participation involves 4 visits to the UW and includes: 

  • Collection of basic demographic information 
  • Response to questionnaires and interviews 
  • Walking and balance tests 
  • Completion of a daily activity log 
  • Use of the investigational prosthetic foot for ~4 weeks 

Each study session takes about 1.5 to 2 hours. Participants will receive up to $600 for participating in the entire study. Transportation (within 50 miles) and parking will be paid. 

Interested? Please contact Monica Smersh, Research Coordinator, at msmersh@uw.edu or 425-331-9737.

Improving Mobility Devices 

Around 7 million Americans use mobility devices such as canes, walkers, and crutches in their daily lives. There is a lot of natural variation in how these mobility devices are used from person-to-person because of everyone’s unique background. Users end up using their devices in creative ways that they may take for granted and they might make interesting modifications to their device, such as decorating or adding some type of attachment Some users may also have faced difficulties or challenges while using their mobility device and have created or found smart solutions.

In this project, we hope to document and showcase all of this variation to help share information about what has been done within the community so that others can learn helpful tips and modifications for their own use. We hope to also use this information to help create or improve existing solutions towards challenges commonly met while using mobility devices to better support the needs of the community.

Project Aims

  • Characterize how mobility devices are used in different scenarios
  • Understand the limitations of current off-the-shelf accessories
  • Investigate ways users make DIY modifications to their own mobility devices
  • Create augmentations for mobility devices to better support the needs of the community

Benefits to the Community

Through this research, we hope to be able to share insights of how different users of mobility devices modify their device to better meet their needs in certain scenarios. These insights can help others who run into similar difficulties to more effectively address their needs. Furthermore, with the information we gain from this study, we hope to develop pipelines to make augmenting mobility devices simpler so that more people in the community can make modifications that may be more involved.

Benefits to Participants and Contributors

By participating in our 90-minute interview study, we will provide a $40 gift card or donate $40 to a charity of your choosing. If you cannot participate in a 90-minute study, we can break it into smaller chunks. Just email the project coordinator to confirm details.


How Do We Get Started? 

If you use a mobility device other than a white cane and are older than 18 years old, please fill out this screening survey. You will get an email afterwards to schedule a time for the interview. If you have any concerns or questions, please email jcao22@uw.edu.

No studies at this time. Please check back soon. 

MATCH Study 

Principal Investigators: Mark Jensen, PhD, Rhonda Williams, PhD 

Chronic pain is a significant problem affecting millions of Americans. Research has shown that psychological treatments can help people with chronic pain manage their pain and improve their quality of life. Three psychological treatments shown to be effective for chronic pain include Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT), Hypnotic Cognitive Therapy (HYP-CT), and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT). While research has shown these treatments are helpful for people with chronic pain, the benefits people experience from these types of treatments can vary from person to person. There is little research showing who responds best to which treatments. The purpose of this study is to better understand who benefits most from MBCT, HYP-CT, and CBT. By identifying a way to match people with the type of psychological treatment for pain that would work the best for them based on certain personal characteristics, we aim to improve treatments for people with chronic pain in the future. 

Participation in study activities includes:

  • In-Person Baseline Assessments (about 2 hours TOTAL): Cognitive Assessment (about 20 minutes), Relaxation and Hypnotic Exercise (about 20 minutes), Brain Wave Activity (EEG) Assessment (60 minutes), Baseline Questionnaire (about 20 minutes)
  • 7 Follow-up Assessment Sets (45-60 minutes per set, 5-7 hours TOTAL): These assessments will happen before you start treatment, after the 2nd, 4th, and 6th treatment sessions; at the end of treatment, and 3 and 6 months after treatment ends.
  • 8 Psychological Treatment Sessions (60 minutes each, 8 hours TOTAL): These individual videoconference treatment sessions will occur on average once per week.

If you participate in this study, we will need 16-20 hours of your time over a 9–12-month period. You can receive up to $350 for completing all study procedures. This study is looking for participants with chronic pain. 

Please fill out this form on ITHS if interested: www.iths.org/participate/the-match-study/

Music-Based Treatment and Pain

Principal Investigator: Mark Jensen, PhD

Researchers have discovered that music may help people manage their pain, but they don't know why it helps. The purpose of this study is to find out how music-based treatments change brain wave activity, and how these changes may explain how these types of treatments improve chronic low back pain.

Study participation will involve one visit to the University of Washington for about 1.5-2 hours, and 2 assessments over the phone which will take 15-20 minutes to complete. Participants will be compensated up to $80 if all study procedures are completed.

The study is looking for both individuals with chronic low back pain AND individuals who are NOT experiencing chronic low back pain.

Please contact Ai Vy Nguyen at 206-616-9513 and/or Zoey Chu at 206-221-5688 if interested.

Music & Hypnosis Study

Principal Investigator: Mark Jensen, PhD

Researchers have discovered that music may help people manage their pain, but they don’t know why it helps.  Self-hypnosis is another technique that can be used for pain management, and hypnotizability may be affected by music. The purpose of this study is to find out how music-based treatments change brain wave activity, and how these changes may explain how these types of treatments affect pain and hypnotizability.  

The study will involve a total of three visits, for about 45 minutes to an hour each, one scheduled per week at the UW Harborview Medical Center (parking reimbursed).

Participants will be compensated up to $75 if all study procedures are completed.

We are actively seeking individuals with chronic pain to participate in this study.

If you have any questions or are interested in participating, please contact the study staff at uwpainstudy@uw.edu, or 206-221-5688.

Non-invasive closed-loop spinal stimulation for restoration of upper extremity function after spinal cord injury

The study aims to test the therapeutic potential of closed-loop electrical stimulation to restore hand and arm function after spinal cord injury. Additionally, we will compare the efficacy of closed-loop stimulation with continuous stimulation. 

Participation involves 90 minutes sessions three times per week for 18 weeks to receive stimulation combined with exercise therapy and undergo assessments of upper limb function and electrophysiologic tests. Participants will repeat the same assessments three months later. Study compensation is $40 per visit. Additionally, participants will get a parking voucher if they drive and park on campus. 

To learn more, please contact Fatma Inanici at finanici@uw.edu or 2060-787-2692; or Adria Robert Gonzales at adriarg@uw.edu

SCI Recovery Study 

The purpose of the study is to understand access to healthcare and recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI), due to firearms or assault. We also want to understand the experiences of individuals who have participated in support programs so that we could improve programs on violence prevention and recovery after violence. 

The study consists of two phases:  

Phase 1 survey: This brief survey (10-15 minutes) covers basic information, your spinal cord injury, and your access to health care and rehabilitation services. It can be completed online, over the phone, or with a paper copy. Participants will be compensated $10 and have the option to express interest in Phase 2.  

To participate in Phase 1, please click this link: SCI-Recovery: Phase1Survey 

Phase 2 interview: This phase involves a more in-depth interview (60-90 minutes). We will revisit topics covered in Phase 1 questionnaire. We will discuss aspects such as the initial injury and care received, any challenges in accessing medical care, therapy services, and community resources, and suggestions for improvement. The interview can be conducted through phone, Zoom, or in-person. Participants are eligible to receive up to $100 as compensation. 

If you are interested in phase 2, please click this link: SCI-Recovery: Phase2Interview 

If you have any questions or are interested in participating via phone, please contact the study staff at scirecovery@uw.edu, or 206-744-9442. 

SCI Sprint Study

SCI Sprint is a study for patients who have had a spinal cord injury. The purpose of the study is to see if it is feasible to do a sprint interval training program (short duration but high intensity) during inpatient rehabilitation and to see if the program is effective in increasing physical fitness. 

Participants must have a spinal cord injury and be doing their initial inpatient rehabilitation at Harborview Medical Center (and meet other requirements). The program involves being trained 3 times per week on an arm ergometer to increase physical fitness along with answering questions about you and your experience. 

For questions or to see if you can participate, you can contact the study team at scisprint@uw.edu or 206-744-3609.   

Research on Hand and Arm Motor Recovery via skin surface Electrical Spinal Cord Stimulation after stroke

This study explores the restoration of hand and arm function after stroke.

This study aims to test the therapeutic potential of transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation for restoring motor function in the upper limb in stroke survivors. Participation involves 60 minutes sessions three times per week for 12 weeks to get stimulation combined with exercise therapy and undergo assessments of upper limb function and electrophysiologic tests. Participants will repeat the same assessments three months later. Study compensation is $20 per visit. Additionally, participants will get a parking voucher if they drive and park on campus.

To learn more, please contact Fatma Inanici at finanici@uw.edu or 206-787-2692, or Adria Robert Gonzales at adriarg@uw.edu

Late Effects of Traumatic Brain Injury (LE-TBI): A collaborative study to improve knowledge about the long-term effects of TBI 

Principal Investigator: Jeanne Hoffman, PhD 

The Late Effects of Traumatic Brain Injury study (LE-TBI) is a collaborative project focused on increasing knowledge about long-term effects of TBI.

Studies researching donated brain tissue following death are critical because they are among the best methods to identify preventative and new treatments for brain disorders. The LE-TBI project represents the most scientifically rigorous effort to date to improve our understanding of long-term outcomes of single and multiple TBIs.   

Participation involves a ~5 hour visit to the University of Washington Medical Center to undergo brain imaging, neuropsychological testing, a blood draw for genomic analysis, and an interview. Participants will be compensated $100, a $15 lunch voucher in the UW Plaza cafeteria and reimbursed for parking/transportation expenses. Participants will be invited back every 2 to 3 years to complete the same assessments, including brain imaging, testing, and a blood draw.   

Please note: By agreeing to this research, you are not consenting to brain tissue donation; that can only be obtained from your next of kin in the hours following death. You are only signing that this is your intent at this time. By making your wishes known, you may ease the burden on your next of kin. 

Are you interested in learning more? Please contact Laurie, research coordinator,  at 206-744-3607 or letbi@uw.edu

Visit our website at tbi.washington.edu for more information. 

 

Late Effects of Traumatic Brain Injury in Military Veterans (LE-TBI-MIL): Military Veteran Brain Tissue Donor Program

Principal Investigator: Jeanne Hoffman, PhD 

The Late Effects of Traumatic Brain Injury in Military Veterans study (LE-TBI-MIL) is a collaborative project focused on increasing knowledge about long-term effects of TBI in the Veteran population.

Studies researching donated brain tissue following death are critical because they are among the best methods to identify preventative and new treatments for brain disorders. The LE-TBI-MIL project represents the most scientifically rigorous effort to date to improve our understanding of long-term outcomes of single and multiple TBIs and specifically for the Veteran population.  Eligible participants are Veterans at least one year out from active duty.

Participation involves a ~5 hour visit to the University of Washington Medical Center to undergo brain imaging, neuropsychological testing, a blood draw for genomic analysis, and an interview. Participants will be compensated $100, a $15 lunch voucher in the UW Plaza cafeteria and reimbursed for parking/transportation expenses. Participants will be invited back every 2 to 3 years to complete the same assessments, including brain imaging, testing, and a blood draw.   

Please note: By agreeing to this research, you are not consenting to brain tissue donation; that can only be obtained from your next of kin in the hours following  death. You are only signing that this is your intent at this time. By making your wishes known, you may ease the burden on your next of kin. 

Are you interested in learning more? Please contact Laurie, research coordinator,  at 206-744-3607 or letbi@uw.edu

Visit our website tbi.washington.edu for more information

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