University of Washington

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine

http://rehab.washington.edu/research/articles/showref.asp?id=4158


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Title:

Two brief versions of the Multi-dimensional Pain Readiness to Change Questionnaire (MPRCQ2)

Author(s):

Nielson, W. R., Armstrong, J. M., Jensen, M. P., & Kerns, R. D

Year:

2009

Publication Info:

Clinical Journal of Pain, 25:48-57

Abstract:

OBJECTIVES: The present study sought to develop 1-item and 2-item versions of subscales from the Multidimensional Pain Readiness to Change Questionnaire, Version 2 (MPRCQ2), a measure of readiness to adopt a variety of pain management and coping strategies commonly taught in multidisciplinary treatment programs.
METHODS: One hundred and ninety patients with rheumatic diseases who entered a Rheumatology Day Program completed the MPRCQ2 and an additional criterion measure, the Pain Stages of Change Questionnaire (PSOCQ), before and after treatment. First one and then a second item that best represented each MPRCQ2 scale were selected based on: (1) the correlations between the items and their parent MPRCQ2 scale; (2) responsivity to change following treatment; (3) correlations of the items with the PSOCQ scales; and (4) authors' consensus of face validity and construct representativeness of items. The psychometric properties of the 1-item and 2-item versions of the MPRCQ2 scales were then examined.
RESULTS: These brief versions provided good approximations of their parent scales and 9/10 were responsive to change following multidisciplinary treatment. Correlations between the brief scales and the PSOCQ scales showed similar relationships as with the full MPRCQ2 scales.
DISCUSSION: The findings support the validity of these brief versions of the MPRCQ2 subscales. We would recommend the use of these versions of the MPRCQ2 when a measure of patient readiness to use a range of pain self-management coping strategies is needed (eg, treatment process research, prediction of success in multidisciplinary treatment), but response burden is a significant issue.

Link to Article:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19158546


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