Skip To Main Content University of Washington Department of Rehabilitation Medicine
  Department of Rehabilitation Medicine 
  maximizing potential across the lifespan

Title:

Physical activity and the incidence of gallbladder sludge or stones during pregnancy

Author(s):

Ko CW, Napolitano PG, Lee SP, Schulte SD, Ciol MA, Beresford SAA

Year:

2014

Publication Info:

American Journal of Perinatology, 31(1):38-48

Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of a physical activity intervention upon the incidence of gallbladder sludge or stones during pregnancy.
STUDY DESIGN: Pregnant women without gallstones were randomized to an intervention to increase moderate to vigorous physical activity or control. Intervention group women received motivational materials and small-group instruction to increase physical activity. Gallbladder ultrasound and blood draws were obtained at entry, 18 weeks' gestation, and 36 weeks' gestation.
RESULTS: In all, 591 were randomized to the intervention and 605 women to control groups. Women in the intervention group reported modestly higher levels of physical activity compared with control women, and fewer women in the intervention group reported no physical activity during pregnancy. The incidence of gallbladder sludge or stones was similar in intervention and control groups at 18 weeks (4.8% versus 5.4%; relative risk 0.89; 95% confidence interval 0.53, 1.47) and 36 weeks (4.3% versus 3.3%; relative risk 1.31; 95% confidence interval 0.70, 2.54). Fasting glucose, lipid, insulin, leptin, and adiponectin levels were similar in the two groups, as was insulin sensitivity and the incidence of gestational diabetes.
CONCLUSION: An intervention to increase moderate to vigorous physical activity did not decrease the incidence of gallbladder sludge or stones during pregnancy and did not result in improvement in maternal metabolic measures.

Link to Article:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23456902

Featured Research Articles

Assistive Technology

View the latest research articles on Assistive Technology written by faculty from the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.

Volunteer to Participate in our Research Studies

The Department of Rehabilitation Medicine is looking for volunteers to participate in research studies on Multiple Sclerosis & Pain Management, and Traumatic Brain Injury.

Level A conformance icon, 
          W3C-WAI Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0
Copyright © 2000-2017 University of Washington